Products | Dominik Mayer – Products, Asia, Productivity

Products

Events

Come join one of the events I host.

Product & Beyond is a monthly meetup of people passionate about products. Design, engineering, product management, marketing, operations, legal and more all partake in the creation of great products. We regularly get together to drink, laugh and casually talk about products and beyond.

Meaningful Discussions in Ho Chi Minh City is the Saigon chapter of the largest face-to-face discussion group with monthly events taking place in 11 countries.

Lean Startup Vietnam host irregular events sharing Lean Startup techniques and experiences.

Digital

Purple Journal is a folder based journaling solution that beautifully renders text files, images, videos and more.

Past

Pomodoro Calendar let you register your Pomodoros of the whole year.

GWT Bootstrap was a wrapper of Bootstrap for Google Web Toolkit.

Google Calendar to Kindle let you send your agenda to your Amazon Kindle.

Recommendations

Fiction

The Carpet Makers on thousands of planets spend their whole life creating one carpet each from the hair of their wives and daughters. This beautiful carpet is for the palace of the emperor. But the emperor is dead and his palace contains not a single hair carpet.

Author Andreas Eschbach unravels they mystery of the hair carpets in a collection of self-contained short stories, all following different protagonists, painting a detailed picture of this foreign world.

Murakami Haruki has written many wonderful books. The ones I highly recommend are:

Podcasts

I listen to quite a few podcasts. These are the English ones I enjoy quite a bit:

The German-speaking audience might like:

Latest Posts

Privacy at Apple  

Former Apple engineer David Shayer explains on TidBITS why he trusts Apple’s new exposure notification. He touches the internal processes that prevent excessive user tracking:

Once I had recorded how many times the Weather and Stocks apps were launched, I set up Apple’s internal framework for reporting data back to the company. My first revelation was that the framework strongly encouraged you to transmit back numbers, not strings (words). By not reporting strings, your code can’t inadvertently record the user’s name or email address. You’re specifically warned not to record file paths, which can include the user’s name (such as /Users/David/Documents/MySpreadsheet.numbers). You also aren’t allowed to play tricks like encoding letters as numbers to send back strings (like A=65, B=66, etc.)

Next, I learned I couldn’t check my code into Apple’s source control system until the privacy review committee had inspected and approved it. This wasn’t as daunting as it sounds. A few senior engineers wanted a written justification for the data I was recording and for the business purpose. They also reviewed my code to make sure I wasn’t accidentally recording more than intended.

Read the whole thing. It’s fascinating.

Sean Ellis Test  

The Pisano blog explaining the Sean Ellis Test:

Sean Ellis test was formed thanks to the experiences gained during the consultation period, and in a very short time, it became a standard throughout the industry. The most indicative question addressed to the clients in this qualitative test is as following:

How would you feel if you could no longer use our product? - Very disappointed - Somewhat disappointed - Not disappointed (it really isn’t that useful)

If the ratio of the answer “very disappointed” is more than %40, then well-done to you; that means you have the product/market fit.